Tag Archives: pride

The Purpose of Suffering in the Eternal Revolution

There are times when we go through deserts of life – the times when we feel that we have been cast adrift with no divine wind in our sails. There are other times when we suffer acute pain: mental, physical, or emotional anguish of a particular kind or from a particular source. Both of these periods in our lives are suffering, and I firmly believe there is a purpose to suffering.

There is meaning in suffering, but that is not what I am concerned with in this post. The meaning of suffering is more metaphysical, which in many cases, and for most people, is not the type of thing you have the mental energy to do while enduring suffering. Purpose speaks to a practical reason or explanation of why this, why now. Recognizing a purpose to your suffering can get you through each day, and then in looking back on a period of suffering you may find the meaning.

We endure suffering in this life to bring us closer to God. Pain curbs the dangers of pride. Feeling alone and powerless turns us back to the Powerful One who said He would not leave us. Pain and suffering remind us that we are not at home in this world. They make us focus on the promise of a life free from the ordeals we experience here and now. Suffering should bring us to hope.

We are not always hopeful when we are called to endure. Long periods of crisis, or painful chronic disorders can bring us to despair and envy instead of leading us away from pride. This happens especially when we thing that someone or something has the answer to “solve” our problem. Worst of all, we might think that there is something we can do to fix our situation, our aliment, our pain. What vice is it that makes us think we can solve our own problems? Pride. The very thing that suffering can help us conquer can be used by the enemy to make our spiritual condition worse.

Pain and suffering are weapons, but they are not just weapons of the enemy. They can be used against us, crushing us into despair, or they can be powerful weapons in our hands, guided by God, to shape us into better practitioners of His will, not ours.

The purpose of suffering is to test and to purify us. It is not a punishment, though it can be a correction. We all suffer, each to a degree that God knows we can endure if we rely on Him. Certainly, some suffer so that they might be miraculously healed for His glory and as a witness of His power. But the majority, most of us, are being called to endure the trials and hurt so that we might be refined, formed, and directed to give glory to God.

Will you be beaten by the hardships in your life, or will you, with the strength of God,  wield them as one of the most powerful weapons in your arsenal of faith?

 

 

Paul Nowak is a husband and father of 6, who also happens to be a writer and author. He has written The Way of the Christian Samurai among other books.

All For the Glory of God

“Whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” 1 Corinthians 10:31

 

As Christians, we hear the instruction to do everything for, or to, the Glory of God. But what does it actually look like when we do things for His glory, and not our own?

The story of Gideon is a great example of this. The odds were against Gideon’s 32,000  Israelite soldiers from the start, facing the combined Midianites and Amelekites that were too numerous to count. However, even those odds were too humanly possible. God had Gideon challenge and test the men until just 300 remained. Unlike the famous Spartans, these 300 had no allies but God alone.

When instructing Gideon to reduce his fighting force, God’s reason was this: “The people with you are too many for me to give the Midianites into their hand, lest Israel boast over me, saying, ‘My own hand has saved me.’ ” When something is to be done for God’s glory, it should be done without personal pride in the accomplishment, and without taking credit for it.

This doesn’t just apply to sports stars and performance artists. It doesn’t just apply to public victory and celebration. It is supposed to apply to everything we do.

Why does it seem that the biggest miracles have all happened in the past? Perhaps we have grown too confident – not just in our own abilities, but in knowing what is possible and impossible. But God is in the impossible tasks He sets before us.

If we set out to do something we know is possible, and achieve it, how have we shown the glory and power of God in that achievement? But if we set out to do what is necessary, against odds that are obviously impossible – then the success can truly be a witness to God’s presence and majesty.

 

 

Paul Nowak is a husband and father of 6, who also happens to be a writer and author. He has written The Way of the Christian Samurai among other books.